Weed & Car Accidents


Canadian researchers examined data collected from 49,111 victims who had been seriously injured or died in an accident and discovered that smoking marijuana three hours before driving can more than double a driver’s chance of being involved in a serious crash.

Researchers specifically looked at cases where tetrahydrocannabionol, the active compound in marijuana, was found in the victims’ blood stream but where other drugs and alcohol were absent.

Yes, marrying Juana significantly impairs an individual’s ability to safely operate a vehicle.

P.S. Am mot laughing… like these guys 😀

Pictures by Brandon Jordan <- Seriously check his work if you are open minded. Some of his work is PG Rated.

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6 thoughts on “Weed & Car Accidents

  1. Ok- first off- people should not drive while under the influence of any drug- including prescription medications. Nor should they drive when exhausted, on a cell phone, eating, putting on makeup, or any other distraction or impairment.

    But a few points. driving under the influence of alcohol increases the risk 7-fold. As does using a cell phone- including hands free.

    As to this study- and I have reviewed the whole paper- not just the abstract- there is a major flaw. They include people who had consumed cannabis within 12hours. Well- guess what. There’s not much that happens in this world without a large percentage of the people having consumed cannabis within 12 hours. They are not showing a cause and effect relationship.

    This is a subject which has been studied endlessly- both in similar reviews of crash data, as well as in real world experiments using humans and both driving simulators and real world driving. Overwhelmingly the studies have found the main effects are slower driving, and decreased reaction time in emergency situations, though neither has been found to be “Statistically meaningful”

    A 2002 review of seven separate studies involving 7,934 drivers reported, “Crash culpability studies have failed to demonstrate that drivers with cannabinoids in the blood are significantly more likely than drug-free drivers to be culpable in road crashes.” “At the present time, the evidence to suggest an involvement of cannabis in road crashes is scientifically unproven.
    REFERENCE: G. Chesher and M. Longo. 2002. Cannabis and alcohol in motor vehicle accidents. In: F. Grotenhermen and E. Russo (Eds.)

    Cannabis alone, particularly in low doses, has little effect on the skills involved in automobile driving.” REFERENCE: Canadian Senate Special Committee on Illegal Drugs. 2002. Cannabis: Summary Report: Our Position for a Canadian Public Policy. Ottawa. Chapter 8: Driving Under the Influence of Cannabis.

    Whereas these results indicate a ‘change’ from normal conditions, they do not necessarily reflect ‘impairment’ in terms of performance effectiveness since few studies report increased accident risk.
    REFERENCE: UK Department of Environment, Transport and the Regions (Road Safety Division). 2000. Cannabis and Driving: A Review of the Literature and Commentary. Crowthorne, Berks: TRL Limited.

    There is no evidence that consumption of cannabis alone increases the risk of culpability for traffic crash fatalities or injuries for which hospitalization occurs, and may reduce those risks. REFERENCE: M. Bates and T. Blakely. 1999. “Role of cannabis in motor vehicle crashes.” Epidemiologic Reviews 21: 222-232.

    However, this impairment is mitigated in that subjects under marijuana treatment appear to perceive that they are indeed impaired…. In contrast to the compensatory behavior exhibited by subjects under marijuana treatment, subjects who have received alcohol tend to drive in a more risky manner. Both substances impair performance; however, the more cautious behavior of subjects who have received marijuana decreases the impact of the drug on performance, whereas the opposite holds true for alcohol.” REFERENCE: A. Smiley. 1999. Marijuana: On-Road and Driving-Simulator Studies. In: H. Kalant et al. (Eds) The Health Effects of Cannabis. Toronto: Center for Addiction and Mental Health. Pp. 173-191.

    In contrast, there was no significant increase in culpability for cannabinoids alone. While a relatively large number of injured drivers tested positive for cannabinoids, culpability rates were no higher than those for the drug free group. Logan, M.C., Hunter, C.E., Lokan, R.J., White, J.M., & White, M.A. (2000). The Prevalence of Alcohol, Cannabinoids, Benzodiazepines and Stimulants Amongst Injured Drivers and Their Role in Driver Culpability: Part II: The Relationship Between Drug Prevalence and Drug Concentration, and Driver Culpability. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 32, 623-32.

    The THC-only drivers had a responsibility rate below that of the drugfree drivers. … While the difference was not statistically significant, there was no indication that cannabis by itself was a cause of fatal crashes.”
    REFERENCE: K. Terhune. 1992. The incidence and role of drugs in fatally injured drivers. Washington, DC: US Department of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Report No. DOT HS 808 065.

    Evidence from the present and previous studies strongly suggests that alcohol encourages risky driving whereas THC encourages greater caution, at least in experiments. Another way THC seems to differ qualitatively from many other drugs is that the formers users seem better able to compensate for its adverse effects while driving under the influence.”
    REFERENCE: H. Robbe. 1995. Marijuana’s effects on actual driving performance. In: C. Kloeden and A. McLean (Eds) Alcohol, Drugs and Traffic Safety T-95. Adelaide: Australia: HHMRC Road Research Unit, University of Adelaide. Pp. 11-20.
    The impairment manifests itself mainly in the ability to maintain a lateral position on the road, but its magnitude is not exceptional in comparison with changes produced by many medicinal drugs and alcohol. Drivers under the influence of marijuana retain insight in their performance and will compensate when they can, for example, by slowing down or increasing effort. As a consequence, THC’s adverse effects on driving performance appear relatively small.”
    REFERENCE: W. Hindrik and J. Robbe and J. O’Hanlon. 1993. Marijuana and actual driving performance. Washington, DC: US Department of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Report No. DOT HS 808 078.

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